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Lego Profit Jumps 36% as Sales of Building Blocks for Girls Soar

Lego A/S profit rose 36 percent in
the first half of the year as sales of new building-block sets
for girls surged and as Europe’s biggest toymaker grabbed global
market share.
Net income climbed to 2.02 billion kroner ($338 million)
from 1.48 billion kroner a year earlier, the Billund, Denmark-
based company said today in a statement. Revenue rose 24 percent
to 9.13 billion kroner.
The “Lego Friends” series, introduced in January in most
markets, is Lego’s sixth attempt over the years to target girls
and the “most significant” new product in a decade, according
to Chief Executive Officer Joergen Vig Knudstorp. Lego said
today that it had sold twice as many of the sets as expected and
will increase production for the Christmas season, hiring 1,000
more workers this year.
“Lego Friends is a result of four years’ development, and
it has been amazing to experience the enthusiastic welcome that
consumers have given the new range,” Knudstorp said today in a
statement. “Sales have been quite astonishing.”
Lego, which is closely held, said it boosted its global
market share to more than 8 percent in the first half, a 1
percentage point gain from a year earlier.
The global toy market has contracted about 4 percent in the
first six months of 2012, Lego said.
Mattel Inc., the world’s largest toymaker, on July 17
reported a 1.2 percent decline in first half revenue. Hasbro
Inc., the world’s second-largest, on July 23 said sales declined
7.6 percent in the period.
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Comments

  • Nice to see Lego doing well, means more good things to come for us in the future...

    So long, of course, as they don't take the eye off the ball and start overpricing, the recent SW Advent Calendar comes to mind. :)

    Hopefully they can reinvest most of those profits to prepare for the next generation of Lego.
  • Awesome news. Amazing they can grow so much in a climate of decline. Looks like they've finally achieved their goal of appealing to girls - more AFOLs next decade!
  • Only mystery is is it parents/adults buying sets for kids and thinking they'd like it or is it actual popularity.

    And i can offically say i'm probably the last person on earth that hasn't falling in love with the line and that i'm proud to be an ex-affol since the friends line is a complete embarrasement in my book.
  • I think adult girls might be another new target market.

    UCS friends maybe. :-D
  • Uh - oh - this is going to mean even MORE sets, meaning I don't know where I will find the room for them all!

    (but seriously: congrats to TLG!)
  • Excellent news, no doubt about it.
  • Only mystery is is it parents/adults buying sets for kids and thinking they'd like it or is it actual popularity.

    And i can offically say i'm probably the last person on earth that hasn't falling in love with the line and that i'm proud to be an ex-affol since the friends line is a complete embarrasement in my book.

    Good for you. Each is free have their own opinion. I think Friends sets fall into sexist stereotypes just like many other girl toys. My belief is LEGO really is focusing on being a profitable business and not trying to set an example for society (although they do maintain some of their old standards IMO). They sold out to a degree (I say they compromised), but as a business that was in financial trouble not too long ago it's doing the right thing. Success of Friends line is a testament they made a good businesss decision.

    Look at any "girl" toy aisle and you'll see what sells. Girls can go to the LEGO aisle if they choose. They are separate lines just like Duplo is for toddlers. Also, remember it's the retail stores that choose the available sets to sell. There must be a reason they don't have many basic building block sets.

    Peace, and you'll be saving a ton of money as an ex-AFOL. :)
  • Only mystery is is it parents/adults buying sets for kids and thinking they'd like it or is it actual popularity.

    Valid question. I think it's both, but from purely circumstantial evidence, I think it's popular with girls. I frequent a LEGO brand store and see girls buying them with parents all the time. I buy them for myself :) as my boys don't have interest in the sets, but do play with the bricks.

  • I would LOVE to have a pink technics set... A portion of the profits could even benefit breast cancer research or something
  • edited August 2012
    Call me a cynic, but the headline could just as easily have been "LEGO profit jumps 36% as RRPs jump 36%". :o/

    Just sayin'.
  • dneul said:

    I would LOVE to have a pink technics set... A portion of the profits could even benefit breast cancer research or something

    Mrs. Darth Texas agrees that would be very cool indeed!
  • ^ & @dneul - I think you have just found a worthy CUUSOO project.
  • edited September 2012

    Only mystery is is it parents/adults buying sets for kids and thinking they'd like it or is it actual popularity.

    And i can offically say i'm probably the last person on earth that hasn't falling in love with the line and that i'm proud to be an ex-affol since the friends line is a complete embarrasement in my book.

    I agree fully in people having their own view, but isn't becoming an ex AFOL just because of one line a little bit of an over reaction?

    You are missing out on what might be a golden period of adult orientated sets because of that. Take the beautiful Haunted House out today as just one example.

  • Is it me or did the fact that they went on about friends seem like they were slightly sticking two fingers up at the ney-sayers? It kind of seemed like they were over justifying the line.

    Still if the profits have gone up they can bring the prices down to those heady days of 2006.
  • richo said:

    Only mystery is is it parents/adults buying sets for kids and thinking they'd like it or is it actual popularity.

    And i can offically say i'm probably the last person on earth that hasn't falling in love with the line and that i'm proud to be an ex-affol since the friends line is a complete embarrasement in my book.

    I agree fully in people having their own view, but isn't becoming an ex AFOL just because of one line a little bit of an over reaction?

    You are missing out on what might be a golden period of adult orientated sets because of that. Take the beautiful Haunted House out today as just one example.

    It's just not the friends line. It's the prices jumping up to ridicilous levels, lego universe getting shut down, Problems with the CMF line(mostly how the "special unique" stuff is showing up in more and more common sets and how darn fast the company is pumping the sets out), the fact that the story lines are getting to be the same things over and over, and severe lack of females in the sets(icky friends don't count). Plus the fact that the Lego company seems to have completly abanded the concept of free-building/mocing these days is not helping my view on the company(Severaly overpriced MBA line does NOT count)

    And with sets i buy and with the lego store whenever i'd go(i need parts from the BAM bin to wrap up a project), i don't buy big sets. While there are bigger sets that catch my eye, i have no room for bigger sets. Plus like with the lego store trip, it's a case of either i could spend my entire vacation souviener budget on ONE lego set or i could get a few grab bags, a BAM kit or 2, maybe check the sale corner, and have money for other places.
  • Still if the profits have gone up they can bring the prices down to those heady days of 2006.

    They could, but why would they? They are not a non-profit, they are not in the charity business, they are in the making profits business.

    If they could raise prices another 20% and get away with it, I have no doubt they would. That is what a business does, charge as much as the market will accept.
  • It's just not the friends line. It's the prices jumping up to ridicilous levels

    Just to play the contrarian...

    Define "redicilous levels" for me please... They are higher than in the past, but so is everything else. Given their profit margins, they don't have room to drop prices 20% and stay in business, their costs are growing as well.

    lego universe getting shut down

    Some people do miss this, and it was indeed a grand experiment, but if it wasn't working, then it wasn't working. If they were losing money at it, they aren't going to continue it, just because you wanted them to.

    Plus the fact that the Lego company seems to have completly abanded the concept of free-building/mocing these days is not helping my view on the company

    Why do you say this? Just because they make a lot of themes doesn't mean the basic bricks are gone. Lego sets a ton of basic brick buckets, brick boxes, and brick collections.

    http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Ultimate-Building-Set-Pieces/dp/B000NO9GT4/

    #6166 is in the top 10 Lego seller list on Amazon all the time and has been for a long time now. They sell a ton of this set. It also sells a ton of copies in the Walmarts and Targets of the world.

    http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Bricks-More-Deluxe-Brick/dp/B002UD8P4S/

    #5508

    and

    http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Bricks-More-Builders-Tomorrow/dp/B0039PUTZY/

    #6177

    Also both sell very well. Combined, those three sets are a large part of TLG's business.

    -------------------

    Finally, if you're an ex-AFFOL, then why are you still here? I would never presume to tell you what to do with your time, but the question becomes, if you're no longer an adult fan of Lego, why continue to post about it?
  • "Some people do miss this, and it was indeed a grand experiment, but if it wasn't working, then it wasn't working. If they were losing money at it, they aren't going to continue it, just because you wanted them to."

    LU was working out. Lego wasn't pulling in enough money from the "target group" and that's why they shut it down

    And as far as why me, an ex-affol is still here, it's partially boredom but compared to how much time i used to spend here, it's not that much time

    And while i doubt they can afford a 20% drop, i've seen the financial profits and they can certainly afford to drop the price of products.

    And there are the boxes of basic legos but nothing that's advertised on tv or online. Nothing that's talked about on their utube channel or on the creator desk. Nothing that i've ever seen in a lego book. Plus outside of the lego store, i can't remember the last time i've seen basic lego boxes in stores not counting the plastic tubs.
  • edited September 2012

    They could, but why would they? They are not a non-profit, they are not in the charity business, they are in the making profits business.

    If they could raise prices another 20% and get away with it, I have no doubt they would. That is what a business does, charge as much as the market will accept.

    No course they wont drop the prices at all. If my profit margins were such as theirs are; I wouldn't its a healthy return. And I do believe they reinvest a lot of it. But I can dream cant I. Stuck on a part time wage it would be nice if I can get more lego for my pound. Still I figure when im in full time work the prices wont bother me as much.
  • Some very interesting points. The thing we need to remember is that Lego really were struggling at one point in the 90s, and it is this new business model, increased emphasis on licences etc, that has turned them round.

    People do buy licenced and endorsed products now, it's a fact of retail and in particular toys that strong brands and licence tie-ins do sell well.

    I agreed on the point about the volume of sets, I would like to see this cut back slightly, as I would the rate they are releasing the collectible minifigures, but we have to hand it to them and say they have delivered a strong growth business.

    If more companies in Europe were trading like Lego, then the European economy would be in far better shape. Remember, what Europe needs is growth. Real growth comes from private companies making profits, and re-investing those profits in job creation. This is exactly what Lego is doing
  • I'm still confused on ths "success" of the friends line. I went to grand opening in Wauwatosa and the Friends sets were not moving at all. The girls were buying all regular stuff.

    I use my Walmart here in town of a good example how I see things. The regularaisle of Lego will get wiped out over time. It gets restocked and, boom, wiped again. The Friends never go down in volume. Last time I saw my buddy maning his toy dept, I asked about Friends. He said the are shelf warmers. They don't move. At the time 2 weeks ago, he was hoping they would clearance stuff out. Well, I was there tonight and 4 diff sets are clearance. I know the big house was now $39.99. He said they had a big center aisle display with half Friends and half Mining sets. They had to remove it after a week as the Mining side was empty and nothing moved off of the Friends side. I don't get it. Is it just here in WI that the line doesn't appear to move?

    That's the thing also I don't understand with limiting the Friends advent calander. If the line is so strong, why make such a limited number? I know you don't want to OVER produce like what happened with the Satr Wars one last year but, if there is such a demand fro Friends,why not get them to everyone?
  • Was told by employee of Anaheim, CA store that the Friends sets sell very well. I would think the "princess" themed items at the adjacent theme park might affect their sales of Friends sets, but apparently not.
  • jdylak said:

    I'm still confused on ths "success" of the friends line. I went to grand opening in Wauwatosa and the Friends sets were not moving at all. The girls were buying all regular stuff.

    I use my Walmart here in town of a good example how I see things. The regularaisle of Lego will get wiped out over time. It gets restocked and, boom, wiped again. The Friends never go down in volume. Last time I saw my buddy maning his toy dept, I asked about Friends. He said the are shelf warmers. They don't move. At the time 2 weeks ago, he was hoping they would clearance stuff out. Well, I was there tonight and 4 diff sets are clearance. I know the big house was now $39.99. He said they had a big center aisle display with half Friends and half Mining sets. They had to remove it after a week as the Mining side was empty and nothing moved off of the Friends side. I don't get it. Is it just here in WI that the line doesn't appear to move?

    That's the thing also I don't understand with limiting the Friends advent calander. If the line is so strong, why make such a limited number? I know you don't want to OVER produce like what happened with the Satr Wars one last year but, if there is such a demand fro Friends,why not get them to everyone?

    Not just you. Where i live, the things aren't moving at all at walmarts i've checked.
  • ^ must be regional differences then. I can say that out here in the Portland area, the Friends line move very well in the LEGO store, and I find lots of empty shelf-space in the Friends section at other retailers a well.
  • I think 'my local Wal-mart' tends to be a bad barometer for measuring Lego sales. Just look at how varied the clearance stories are on the Wal-mart clearance thread. I know that even in the Dallas Ft Worth area I have found vast differences in the Lego aisles between stores 5 miles apart. In any event, Lego doing well equals more excellent products in the years to come.
  • edited September 2012

    I think 'my local Wal-mart' tends to be a bad barometer for measuring Lego sales ... In any event, Lego doing well equals more excellent products in the years to come.

    This is surely the point. It's either this or LEGO are lying about the success of this line, which is a bizarre idea.

    Although I don't understand the Friends line, I'm the absolute opposite to a 9 year old girl and so I wouldn't expect to. I was struck by an opinion piece in The [London] Times on Saturday by a female columnist saying that she had set her mind against the Friends line since it was setting an overly pastel and girly example to her daughter but when exposed to the products her daugher and friends were completely captivated.

    I want the LEGO group to have success selling all kinds of products to all kinds of customers so that some of the products, like Haunted House mentioned above, will completely captivate me.
  • Friends sets never stay on the shelves at Glendale and Anaheim stores. I have not seen an Olivia's House or Heartlake Vet at a LEGO Store in who knows how long, and most of the sets are pretty much always backordered at Lego.com.
  • My 8 year old son is obsessed with Lego but it wasn't until the friends line that my 5 year old girl also went down that dark path. She's actually building now and asking to go to the store as much as my son. Are they stereotypical girls toys? Sure but they're no worse than American girl, Barbie, or any other brand targeted just for girls. In addition, the builds ate phenomenal. Anyone checked out the detail in Olivia's house? Even the smaller builds have unique parts and tremendous detail. My only complaint are the crap mini figures. I never understood why Lego derivated from their regular m
  • ^ ask your daughter what she thinks of the minifigure. Hundreds of thousands of girl playtesters told LEGO that the girls they were targeting much preferred the Friends style to the standard minifigure. Kids already into LEGO and adults may not like them, but the newly targeted LEGO girl does, and that's exactly who they are aimed at.
  • ^ Yeah, I'm with you on that one. I buy myself Friends sets and give the minifigs to a friend's girl, she loves them, I get to be the cool "auntie" and I still get to keep all the pieces. Win-win-win.
  • edited September 2012
    How can one judge Lego sales by empty shelf space when it very well could be that the employees of that dept are good about keeping the shelves stocked? So unless one has inside info it's supposition as to the amount of sales a store has of any line of Lego or any other product.
  • Dougts,
    My daughter definitely prefers the regular minifigs. She loves the cmf series and insists on getting all the females and usually a few others. The friends figures are clunky and hard to pose and place. The male Peter figure is a poor mans George Michael
  • ^ i understand, but I suspect your daughter was already a LEGO fan/user, and therefore is not the target demographic LEGO was going after with Friends. Their testing of girls not already inclined to use LEGO indicated a pretty overwhelming preference for the Friends mini-dolls.

    The great thing is, with these sets being system/minifig scale, everyone wins. Those who prefer minifigures can pretty easily swap those into the Friends sets with little or no modifcations. win-win!
  • edited September 2012
    She was into the minifigures but it's the friends line that really got her building. Like I said, the figures are my only complaint. Everything else gets the highest marks
  • How can one judge Lego sales by empty shelf space when it very well could be that the employees of that dept are good about keeping the shelves stocked? So unless one has inside info it's supposition as to the amount of sales a store has of any line of Lego or any other product.

    And that is what I am going with. I know the Walmart toy head. And its not empty shelves, its full shelves. I just got back from the Lego Wauwatosa and the guy also said the same thing. They do not move and he doesn't understand where it comes from that is such a strong line. Ninjago and Star Wars. He notices girls still buying regular city sets. Funny because as I was there a mom was trying her hardest to get her two daughters to buy Friends. It was funny as we watched and the youngest kept insisting the were not Lego sets. "Lego girls don't look like that" she kept saying and she pointed then to the girl in the camper set.
  • jdylak said:

    How can one judge Lego sales by empty shelf space when it very well could be that the employees of that dept are good about keeping the shelves stocked? So unless one has inside info it's supposition as to the amount of sales a store has of any line of Lego or any other product.

    And that is what I am going with. I know the Walmart toy head. And its not empty shelves, its full shelves. I just got back from the Lego Wauwatosa and the guy also said the same thing. They do not move and he doesn't understand where it comes from that is such a strong line. Ninjago and Star Wars. He notices girls still buying regular city sets. Funny because as I was there a mom was trying her hardest to get her two daughters to buy Friends. It was funny as we watched and the youngest kept insisting the were not Lego sets. "Lego girls don't look like that" she kept saying and she pointed then to the girl in the camper set.
    Good to know there's girls out there with a good sense of taste
  • One has to be very careful with the 'empty retail shelf' argument.

    If I used that argument, I would say that City and Star Wars are poor retail sellers. I almost never see empty shelves for them at my Target. We know that this isn't true.

    I think looking at shelfing to determine success sometimes works and sometimes doesn't. I think sometimes it works and other times it doesn't.

    Ninjago and Friends were impossible to find for at least a good 4 months this year. I have seen bits and spurts when certain new lines first come out to retail they are harder to find. I saw some of this with Super Heroes/Batman and Monster Fighters. On the other hand, I have not seen that with Lord of the Rings. I think we can gauge a bit from this.
    On the flip, right now, Ninjago and Friends sets have been well-stocked for several months at my local stores. (Spinners are the exception.) City and Star Wars has been stocked well all this year. I don't think that means Ninjago isn't selling, or even Friends isn't selling. I don't think that means Star Wars and City are unsuccessful lines.

    One also can't gauge things like demographics, amount of stock, online orders, time of year, etc.

    I think the true test here is going to be the holiday buying season, which I think at this point consumers are gearing up for, so stock doesn't move as much right now, unlike the after holiday season when people have gift cards. Let's see in November/December how easy/difficult it is to buy Lego Friends. Considering they are ramping up stock, though, even that may not tell us much, if they have accurately gauged how much they can sell.


    As for the minifigs, when I saw them, I knew my girls would love them. They do love regular minifigs as well, too.


    If Friends is a continued seller, and they can sustain the girl builder, the question to me is what is next?

    Everyone has stated (and I agree ) that Lego Friends was to start capturing a market that has not been interested in Lego. Once you capture that interest, though, what do you do you do with it?? Are those kids going to only want the same theme? WIll they want different themes? To keep interest do they need to stick only with these minifigs, with very 'girly' lines?

    It seems they can
    - continue just cranking out Friends, and assume that is it (Which is a good short term strategy, but not long term.)
    - Create a second 'girl' line
    - Make a line or two that is more neutral like the Harry Potter line, where there is more than just the token female character, where there are lots of details for story-telling and where the theme isn't just vehicles/fighting.

    Monster Fighters, was really the one line that came out this year that hit any element of the third. It has a very good female minifig to boxes in the line ratio, and while the theme says 'fighters', there are several sets that are really far more than that.


    I think it's still too early to really tell whether Friends will continue to be a success, or gauge what their next steps will be.

  • It seems they can
    - continue just cranking out Friends, and assume that is it (Which is a good short term strategy, but not long term.)
    - Create a second 'girl' line
    - Make a line or two that is more neutral like the Harry Potter line, where there is more than just the token female character, where there are lots of details for story-telling and where the theme isn't just vehicles/fighting.
    I think a second line is unlikely - they would just be cannibalizing their own sales for the most part. I suspect they will continue cranking out Friends, with different sub-themes per wave, just like City does. I also hope you are right on the third idea. They have become so IP-focused, they don't have a lot of leeway with a lot of those lines, but they can certainly be more gender-neutral, or at least girl-friendly in some of the original lines. MF is a perfect example, as you say. The next round of adventure-style theme could be done similarly as well.
  • They could consider licensing a theme like Hunger Games, which has good cross-gender appeal, but has had strong girl appeal despite being action-oriented. There's plenty of fighting, traps, and so forth. The gigantic amount of Hunger Games-induced enthusiasm that little girls have suddenly acquired for archery proves that the right media can really alter gender-stereotypical roles.
  • ^ seems a bit over the target age range though
  • Hunger Games has turned out to be really popular with the pre-teen crowd, too. Call it the 9-12s... perfectly good Lego target demographic.
  • ugh. I have a 10 year old and no way I would let her watch that movie. it's teen+ content.

    but I guess that's America today...
  • Yes... Because The Hunger Games is SO proper a subject material for kids...

    Lets see, a competition that has kids trying to kill other kids. THAT is great Lego material! *eye roll*

    But then I hold the same opinion on LotR, and we have that. Recently re-watched that trilogy with my wife and we both agree those are adults only movies with no business being watched by kids.

    But Firefly is bypassed because of a prostitute, the oldest (and perhaps most honest) profession in the world.

    I must be weird, I don't mind if my kids see or hear about sex, or a naked human body, that is a normal healthy part of life. What I want to keep them from seeing is lots of violence and gore.
  • ^ don't worry, there is no chance in heck LEGO would even consider doing a Hunger Games theme - they wouldn't want to touch that controversy with a 10-foot pole.

    the LotR sets are at least fantasy violence. Not saying it's ok, but it's a bit less realistic and potentially scary that HG. in the end though, LotR sales are lagging because it's an adult IP, not because it's violent.
  • dougts said:

    ^ seems a bit over the target age range though

    Don't they have out Lord of the RIngs? How is that different than Hunger Games, when looking at target age? If anything, Hunger Games is at a younger level than Lord of the Rings.

    If you compare books, Hunger Games is rated at a 5th grade level book. Lord of the RIngs is a 6th grade level book.

    I would say these days, far more kids have read Hunger Games than Lord of the Rings. My 9 year old just finished the Lord of the Rings, and she knows nobody else that has read it. She knows people that have already read Hunger Games.

    Both movies are also rated PG-13.


    I have to say, though, I have always felt that Lord of the Rings was too far above Lego's target age range. If they can do Lord of the Rings, though, I see no issue with them doing a Hunger Games line.



    I think a second line is unlikely - they would just be cannibalizing their own sales for the most part. I suspect they will continue cranking out Friends, with different sub-themes per wave, just like City does. I also hope you are right on the third idea. They have become so IP-focused, they don't have a lot of leeway with a lot of those lines, but they can certainly be more gender-neutral, or at least girl-friendly in some of the original lines. MF is a perfect example, as you say. The next round of adventure-style theme could be done similarly as well.

    A second line really depends on their sales numbers. Short term it makes no sense. Long term, if their numbers are good, it makes sense.

    There are a gazillion 'boy' lines, and generally they do not cannibalize each other. (I state generally, because I think with so many new lines out this year, they actually have a bit.) If Friends becomes a success with a high volume, there is no reason a second line would cannibalize. It is not there at this time, though, and who knows if it will be.

    My preference, though, is that third choice. I want some great neutral options for my girls with the characterisitics I mentioned. There are virtually no lines or sets that do that.




  • edited September 2012
    tamamahm said:

    dougts said:

    ^ seems a bit over the target age range though

    Don't they have out Lord of the RIngs? How is that different than Hunger Games, when looking at target age? If anything, Hunger Games is at a younger level than Lord of the Rings.
    As I said above, the huge difference is fantasy violence vs. realistic violence. I agree with you, and always have, on the LotR target age problem for LEGO.

    Also important to note we are talking movies here, not books. LotR sets are based on the movies, and in the impossible scenario that LEGO did HG, it would also be based on the movies.

    But again, this will never happen. If you can't see the psychological differences in the fantasy vs. reality thing, then you aren't really looking. a HG line would engender a backlash to make the Friends stuff look like child's play.

  • CCCCCC
    edited September 2012
    tamamahm said:

    dougts said:

    ^ seems a bit over the target age range though

    Don't they have out Lord of the RIngs? How is that different than Hunger Games, when looking at target age?
    LOTR is humans and humanesque characters killing mainly fantasy creatures on an adventure to destroy evil. Hunger Games is kid-on-kid murder for the pleasure of viewers on TV.

    Violence in both, but the reason for killing is somewhat different. LOTR is killing for survival of good in a struggle against evil, HG is killing (again for survival, but here it is personal survival) but for the pleasure of a TV audience. Of course, it is more complex than that, with issues such as self-sacrifice (in both) for others, but that is a fairly broadbrush one-line summary of it, and why Lego would never do it.
  • tamamahm said:


    Both movies are also rated PG-13.

    This is true, and one of the more sad things about our society...

    We find violence acceptable, but if there was a topless woman in that movie, it would be rated R.

    That is the wrong way around...
  • ^ Let me do the reversal for you .... pause at 4.24:



    Or this is slightly more professional


  • tamamahm said:


    Both movies are also rated PG-13.

    This is true, and one of the more sad things about our society...

    We find violence acceptable, but if there was a topless woman in that movie, it would be rated R.

    That is the wrong way around...
    That's the big difference between the cultures of America & Europe. To subdue one's violent tendencies should be preferred to glorification of the human body. But I guess that just makes Lego more American then =)
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