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Maximum Exposure for Brick Films....

edited June 2011 in Photography/Video
Ok, I've been making "Brick Films" now since '09 but only really started getting serious in the last year.
The problem I have is exposure. I've put films up on "Bricks In Motion" and "Brick Films" but the problem with both sites is the fact most members are under the 'age of appreciation'.
Case in point- a 6sec stop-mo where 2 characters stand on a 32x32 green base plate and one gets hit by a tree (lasting 6secs) gets 5x more hits (and comments) that a video I posted that takes months to make (which only gets 1 comment).
I'd like to know if anyone knows of a site that is actually run and viewed by adults who appreciate the value of work as opposed to kids who have no idea.
I understand this may seem harse but I'm just getting annoyed that I' workin hard and getting nowhere.
If anyone knows any good sites I'd much appreciate it :D

Comments

  • Jasen,

    I think it has to do with the attention span of us adults. Just like on Youtube.
    When a film is under 60 seconds, I will take a look at it.
    If it is above the 60 seconds, I will skip it for 99% of the times.

    Children have a larger attention span and will watch the longer movie.
  • edited June 2011
    No offensive intended but I think you missed my point:
    Case in point- a 6sec stop-mo where 2 characters stand on a 32x32 green base plate and one gets hit by a tree (lasting 6secs) gets 5x more hits (and comments) that a video I posted that takes months to make (which only gets 1 comment).
    I know of plenty Lego Stop-Mo that go well over 1min that are excellent that do well (granted they use After Effects etc) but I'm just a starter who relies on good stories rather than effects. Case in point:

    I don't wanna blow my own trumpet but I put effort into it and would like comments that are bigger than "nice" and "good work" you know....

    As for someone else - check this - it is over a minute and absolutely awesome:

    He used green screen and Adobe AE - I strive for this :D
  • They don't seem to work?...
  • I've got the same frustration that you do, Jasen. I wish I knew a way to get more exposure that doesn't include paying to have the films advertised, but I don't. I've gotten discouraged on putting together any further films due to the few views I do get in contrast to the tens of thousands of views I see other brick films get, which I feel they don't deserve.
  • edited June 2011
    which I feel they don't deserve.
    I forgot to add that it is not my place to deem the worthines of things other people decide to watch. I just wish I could make more people watch my own stuff.
  • What kind of comments are you looking for?

    You know, a lot of great artists have been under-appreciated during their lifetimes only to become famous and acclaimed posthumously. Art is a labor of love. Recognition can be very hard to come by, even when you're really good. If you really love doing what you do, I hope that you continue your efforts. I know that it can be discouraging to see crap get more attention than your own diligent efforts at artistic expression, but if this is your passion I urge you to persevere and take solace in knowing that yours is a labor of love.
  • Why don't you post links to them here?
    @Jasen - I found the videos you posted in your "introduce yourself" post, but only because I looked at all your posts... I don't spend any time on YouTube browsing for LEGO stop-motion, so the chance that I'll see one of your videos if it isn't mentioned on a LEGO blog (or on these forums) is about zero.

    Eurobricks has a special forum for this. Have you tried posting there?
    http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showforum=120
  • edited June 2011
    which I feel they don't deserve.
    I forgot to add that it is not my place to deem the worthines of things other people decide to watch. I just wish I could make more people watch my own stuff.
    Yeah I got what you meant :)
    @Brickmatic - yeah totally agree with what you're saying. Regardless if notmany watch I'll keepmaking them and then (hopefully) eventually when one goes viral they willall get watched :)

    @jwsmart - thanks for the link and youropinion which is spot on. It's hard to find good ones. Even if you search "Lego stop-mo" thru You tube you have tofilter through alot of crap :/
  • Having now been able to watch them both, I would say the difference is in excitement rather than length. It doesn't matter how 'well' it's animated (and your's does seem to be animated very well), if the story doesn't grip the viewer within the first minute they're likely to switch off. While stars wars obviously already has a large captive audience so is a bit of an unfair comparison, perhaps you should try a shorter animation with more gripping intro (doesn't have to be action packed, hitchcock never was). Hope this comes across as positive and helpful :)
  • Have you read the April 2011 issue of BrickJournal? It's in LEGO brand stores (at least the one near me) or you can order it online: http://twomorrows.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=78&products_id=962
    Some interesting info about Brickfilms, some interviews, and examples of other's lighting setups, tips, etc.
  • @andhe your attitude typifies the problem that exists and I'm not saying it's a bad thing - it's just the way it is. If I tagged "star wars" I'd probably get more views but even more angry comments (unless I add a SW figure in the BG and mention it haha)
    As for capturing the audience - in YT movies the attention span is how you've mentioned but I stand by my intro as I wanted to build the mood (hence the George Michael quote to break it up). Brick films can't all be bang for buck - IMO they need a story and that's how I will continue to do them. Anyone can pump out something without a story (and that's fine as but where will it get you - sure you'll getmany more views but now you can like/dislike - is it worth it?
    But for the record -I agree. It was positive and helpful.
  • @jwsmart - cool link thank you
  • To be perfectly honest, I watch brickfilms for the Stop Motion. I like being WOWed at how much the animator makes them come to life. While I appreciate the plot (I.e. the movie Cyclic which is AWESOME) I appreciate more animation. It doesn't have to be action, it just has to surprise me in the way the Legos move.
  • Jansen,
    Just want to give you my thoughts, if it comes across negative I appologise in advance.
    Firstly I have to say that I have never tried animation (would love to at some point) and have seen very few examples to compare yours too.
    I think your animation is great, the traffic looks really good and the speed etc looks natural, The mouth animations seemed good too.
    I have watched it 3 times over a number of days to try to ensure I am not being influenced by the mood I'm in etc, but each time I have found I struggle to 'get into' it.
    The whole George Michael bit throws me every time, I really dont get that section, maybe its just me, but the man is standing there on the street and suddenly says 'George Michael?', cuts to someone (George?) either dancing or doing something leud, I'm sorry but I just dont get that and I think that leaves me thinking 'what the?' for the rest of the movie. Is the briefcase guy supposed to have heard him or something?

    Love the subtle things like the guy waiting for the bus leaning forward to see if its coming soon. The skateboarder on the front of the truck. etc.
    I am guessing you voiced it all and I think it would have benefitted from a different voice for the bad guy. Also the background traffic noise is nice to set the scene, but it stays at the same volume whilst the bad guy is talking in the house, if you lower the traffic noise when you cut to the bad guy it would feel more like he is in a house.
    Typing this on the fly, but I guess the key is about making it believable (not fully believable, it is LEGO!!) but the more realistic the sounds, actions, etc the more you are drawn into it.
    Just my (complete noob) thoughts, hope they are helpful and not too negative.
    Would love to see some more.
  • edited June 2011
    @Jasen
    Brick films can't all be bang for buck - IMO they need a story and that's how I will continue to do them. Anyone can pump out something without a story (and that's fine as but where will it get you - sure you'll get many more views but now you can like/dislike - is it worth it?
    You know, a lot of Hollywood films are criticized for having crappy storytelling despite excellent visuals. Some of these even mange to be blockbuster, high grossing films. On the other hand, there are many excellent independent films with great storytelling that get very little exposure to mainstream audiences. Making something popular is different from making something artistic. It can overlap, but it isn't a given.

    As for practical suggestions for your films, I would suggest paying more careful attention to your white balance. Your film tends to have a yellow color cast, which I presume is a result of your lighting. Properly setting your white balance prior to filming or color correcting in post production will make your films look better.
  • edited June 2011
    Jasen,
    Just want to give you my thoughts, if it comes across negative I apologise in advance.
    Firstly I have to say that I have never tried animation (would love to at some point) and have seen very few examples to compare yours too.
    I think your animation is great, the traffic looks really good and the speed etc looks natural, The mouth animations seemed good too.
    Yeah my lip sync was dodgy actually. The crim was ok but the guy with the phone was not so good.
    I have watched it 3 times over a number of days to try to ensure I am not being influenced by the mood I'm in etc, but each time I have found I struggle to 'get into' it.
    The whole George Michael bit throws me every time, I really dont get that section, maybe its just me, but the man is standing there on the street and suddenly says 'George Michael?', cuts to someone (George?) either dancing or doing something leud, I'm sorry but I just dont get that and I think that leaves me thinking 'what the?' for the rest of the movie. Is the briefcase guy supposed to have heard him or something?
    Ok, you're obviously not familiar with him being caught in a 'situation' in a toilet block somewhere in L.A.. That was it - pure and simple - just a throw-away scene I though of on the fly. It had nothing to do with the story, as such, which you have pointed out but that's what I do eg the Skateboarder which you also noticed. :)
    It's what I do. I like to have stuff to make you watch it a few times (eg Simpsons with signs and background nonsense).
    I'd prefer not to be straight forward as many are. No offense to them but I just wanna try something other than that.
    Love the subtle things like the guy waiting for the bus leaning forward to see if its coming soon. The skateboarder on the front of the truck. etc.
    I am guessing you voiced it all and I think it would have benefitted from a different voice for the bad guy. Also the background traffic noise is nice to set the scene, but it stays at the same volume whilst the bad guy is talking in the house, if you lower the traffic noise when you cut to the bad guy it would feel more like he is in a house.
    Yeah - I tried to get others to help with voices but it was problematic to say the least. Too much 'ping pong emails' for my liking.
    As for the bad guy, watch again, he's actually in a backyard with a high fence :)
    Typing this on the fly, but I guess the key is about making it believable (not fully believable, it is LEGO!!) but the more realistic the sounds, actions, etc the more you are drawn into it.
    Just my (complete noob) thoughts, hope they are helpful and not too negative.
    Would love to see some more.
    All good, hope my responses clarify your comments without being a complete knob too haha
    @yys4u - totally agree. Some is just amazing. Granted they use AE etc but still - it's a skill I'm yet to fully learn :)
  • edited June 2011
    @Jasen
    You know, a lot of Hollywood films are criticized for having crappy storytelling despite excellent visuals. Some of these even mange to be blockbuster, high grossing films. On the other hand, there are many excellent independent films with great storytelling that get very little exposure to mainstream audiences. Making something popular is different from making something artistic. It can overlap, but it isn't a given.

    As for practical suggestions for your films, I would suggest paying more careful attention to your white balance. Your film tends to have a yellow color cast, which I presume is a result of your lighting. Properly setting your white balance prior to filming or color correcting in post production will make your films look better.
    Top paragraph: yes totally agree.
    Bottom paragraph: I filmed "Incentive" with a crappy $100 camera but I filmed "Plastic" with a new DSLR. It's a whole new ballgame now. Incredible machine with a big book. So I'm working on fixing the lighting. I know I need to. The yellowing was annoying in the later but I need to invest more but alas - the actual Lego consumes most of my funds haha :P
  • ^ Ooo. What camera did you get?
  • I got a Nikon 3100C with up to 300mm dual lenses :D
    It's a steep learning curve for sure. Next I need to get something to cover the lights to reduce that glare and yellowing and I'm sorted :)
    I recently got Adobe CS5 too so the only way is up :D
  • ^ Hey, I've got a Nikon 3100! Cool. The learning curve isn't all that bad.

    For the lights, if you have diffused light it will soften the glare. Something transparent but frosted is one way to go. Bouncing the light off of a white surface is another. The yellowing is inherent to the light source. You lamp doesn't give off light at each frequency in equal intensities and that is why it looks yellow. You can filter out certain frequencies from the mix to get other colors. This is what colored theatrical gels do. That is also, incidentally, how your camera captures color: the sensor measures light intensity, a color filter array over the sensor makes it so the different colors are detected. You can correct issues with inaccuracies with color capture by using color correction prior to capturing an image or apply color calibration in post processing already captured images.
  • I may have blown it out of proportion haha but since the age of 3 I've never red a manual unless I'm problem solving haha.
    I'm fimiliar with most of the lighting ideas as I've got a background in 'live action' films too but to master it on a smaller scale is something that doing on the cheap is proving to be the curve of the unknown. I was wondering (now that we've fully hi-jacked this thread) would greaseproof paper in front of the globes work? I'd obviously square it up and clip it....
    Thanks for the links btw :D
  • ^ No problem :) Greaseproof.... is that wax paper? Yeah, I think it would diffuse the light well.
  • Cool thanks yeah wax is grease :D
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